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TNS:could not resolve the connect identifier specified
Backtrace message unwound by exceptions
invalid identifier
PL/SQL compilation error
internal error
missing expression
table or view does not exist
end-of-file on communication channel
TNS:listener unknown in connect descriptor
insufficient privileges
PL/SQL: numeric or value error string
TNS:protocol adapter error
ORACLE not available
target host or object does not exist
invalid number
unable to allocate string bytes of shared memory
resource busy and acquire with NOWAIT specified
error occurred at recursive SQL level string
ORACLE initialization or shutdown in progress
archiver error. Connect internal only, until freed
snapshot too old
unable to extend temp segment by string in tablespace
Credential retrieval failed
missing or invalid option
invalid username/password; logon denied
unable to create INITIAL extent for segment
out of process memory when trying to allocate string bytes
shared memory realm does not exist
cannot insert NULL
TNS:unable to connect to destination
remote database not found ora-02019
exception encountered: core dump
inconsistent datatypes
no data found
TNS:operation timed out
PL/SQL: could not find program
existing state of packages has been discarded
maximum number of processes exceeded
error signaled in parallel query server
ORACLE instance terminated. Disconnection forced
TNS:packet writer failure
see ORA-12699
missing right parenthesis
name is already used by an existing object
cannot identify/lock data file
invalid file operation
quoted string not properly terminated

RE: mysql

Ellis R. Miller

2005-04-07

Replies:
This is a couple years old but still interesting benchmarking regarding
MySQL:

http://www.eweek.com/slideshow/0,3670,s=1590&a=23120&po=1&i=1,00.asp

MySQL 5.0 now supports stored procedures, triggers, and views, in
particular, and as someone else already mentioned PostgreSQL these features
as well as a host of other advanced RDBMS features for many years.

In the spirit of LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) I would embrace MySQL
and consider the learning experience a healthy distraction...like smoking or
surfing for pornography on Saturdays while the wife is at the grocery...in
both cases 45 minutes a week and one cigarette afterwards so what's the big
deal.

I have developed a couple of LAMP applications and found they are infinitely
less complex thus infinitely simpler to maintain and secure and in those
cases MySQL and the LAMP solution, overall, offered a darn stable, cheap,
and homogenous (runs on Solaris or Linux, for example) alternative to Access
(please reference Star Trek "The trouble with Tribbles" with regard to
Access propagating itself to your enterprise LAN) or MS SQL Server. Further,
MySQL serves and is often recommended as the backend database to various
open source applications such as Snort IDS (Intrusion Detection System). In
that sense, it is worth installing, configuring, and administrating at least
one MySQL database as it is often coupled with other various open source
tools & applications such as sniffers, intrusion detection systems, web log
analyzers, source code management, etc.

On a more practical note, since I am forever flirting with the IT job market
while secretly earning my MTA truck driving certification (don't tell my
wife it's going to be surprise) I have noticed an increased demand for
Oracle DBA experience as a primary skill and MySQL as a secondary one which
still only accounts for around 3 contracts over the past couple months where
I have actually answered the phone (usually I just turn up the volume on
Windows Media Player), spoken with a "person" or an IT "I Am Sorry I Am Not
Technical" Recruiter. The third most popular skill is the ability to work
feral children hopped up on back pain medication and ready to swing on that
kid whose basketball went in their IT flower garden back in 1976, the same
year that handsome Bruce Jenner won the gold in the decathlon. It's like he
was poured into those 1970's running shorts.

On a side note, when I purchase a new car I approach the dealership under
the assumption the middle-aged guy with the singular forehead sheen from too
much Brylcreem whose smoking a cigarette and drinking coffee in the middle
of the showroom whilst polishing his high school state football championship
ring isn't actually the head of Engineering for General Motors...he's just
there to sell yet oddly enough he knows virtually all of the primary
features and cool acronyms from the glossy brochure despite never owning his
own wrench. If someone has them the IT recruiters of America need the
Solaris and Oracle RDBMS glossy colored brochures...I am working on the one
entitled "The Java and You."



-----Original Message-----
From: oracle-l-bounce@(protected)]
On Behalf Of Walt Weaver
Sent: Monday, April 04, 2005 4:03 PM
To: oracle_l
Subject: Re: mysql

On Apr 4, 2005 12:54 PM, stephen booth <stephenbooth.uk@(protected):
> On Apr 4, 2005 7:11 PM, David <thump@(protected):
> > What are the largest pros and cons involved in discussing mysql versus
> > Oracle?
>
> MySQL doesn't have the recoverability features of Oracle, you lose a
> disk and you've lost everything since the last backup.

Not true. MySQL binlogs are similar to Oracle redo logs and can be
used for point-in-time recovery. We have over 200 MySQL databases
running 4.x with binlogs and replication and have experienced no data
loss from server crashes.

>
> MySQL scaling is a joke.

It certainly isn't in Oracle's league as far as scalaility is concerned.

>
> Stephen
>
--Walt Weaver
 Bozeman, Montana
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